Overview

Criminology is the study of crime and criminal behavior, as well as the social, economic, and psychological factors that contribute to these behaviors. It is a multidisciplinary field that incorporates elements of sociology, psychology, law, and economics in order to understand the causes of crime and the ways in which it can be prevented and controlled.

As a learning path, criminology provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the various theories, methods, and approaches used to study crime and criminal behavior. This includes exploring the social, economic, and psychological factors that contribute to criminal behavior, as well as the ways in which crime is measured, investigated, and prosecuted.

Students may also study the different types of crime and criminal behavior, including violent crime, property crime, drug offenses, and white-collar crime, as well as the impact of crime on individuals, communities, and society as a whole.

In addition to traditional coursework, students may also have the opportunity to engage in hands-on learning through internships, research projects, and field placements, allowing them to apply their knowledge and skills in real-world settings.

Overall, criminology is a dynamic and challenging field of study that prepares students for a range of careers in law enforcement, criminal justice, and social work, as well as for advanced study in related fields.

Jobs you expect

There are a wide range of career opportunities available for individuals with a degree in criminology, including:

  1. Law enforcement officer: Criminologists may work as police officers, detectives, or federal agents, investigating crimes and enforcing laws.
  2. Probation officer: Criminologists may work with individuals who have been released from prison, monitoring their behavior and helping them reintegrate into society.
  3. Forensic scientist: Criminologists may work in forensic labs, analyzing physical evidence from crime scenes and helping to solve cases.
  4. Corrections officer: Criminologists may work in prisons or other correctional facilities, supervising inmates and ensuring the safety of staff and the public.
  5. Social worker: Criminologists may work in social service agencies, providing support and assistance to individuals and families affected by crime.
  6. Research assistant: Criminologists may work in research positions, collecting and analyzing data on crime trends and patterns.
  7. Crime scene investigator: Criminologists may work as crime scene investigators, collecting and analyzing physical evidence from crime scenes to help solve cases.
  8. Lawyer: Criminologists may go on to pursue careers as attorneys, representing clients in criminal cases and advocating for justice.
  9. Criminology professor: Criminologists may also work as professors, teaching criminology courses at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  10. Policy analyst: Criminologists may work in policy positions, analyzing the effectiveness of current crime prevention and control strategies and making recommendations for improvement.

Universities & Schools

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Certificates

T-SHAPED EXPERT

Criminology

Economics & Social Sciences

You made the decision, now it's time to enhance it and gain the depth of knowledge you need to advance.

T-SHAPED EXPERT

Criminology

Economics & Social Sciences

You made the decision, now it's time to enhance it and gain the depth of knowledge you need to advance.

Overview

Criminology is the study of crime and criminal behavior, as well as the social, economic, and psychological factors that contribute to these behaviors. It is a multidisciplinary field that incorporates elements of sociology, psychology, law, and economics in order to understand the causes of crime and the ways in which it can be prevented and controlled.

As a learning path, criminology provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the various theories, methods, and approaches used to study crime and criminal behavior. This includes exploring the social, economic, and psychological factors that contribute to criminal behavior, as well as the ways in which crime is measured, investigated, and prosecuted.

Students may also study the different types of crime and criminal behavior, including violent crime, property crime, drug offenses, and white-collar crime, as well as the impact of crime on individuals, communities, and society as a whole.

In addition to traditional coursework, students may also have the opportunity to engage in hands-on learning through internships, research projects, and field placements, allowing them to apply their knowledge and skills in real-world settings.

Overall, criminology is a dynamic and challenging field of study that prepares students for a range of careers in law enforcement, criminal justice, and social work, as well as for advanced study in related fields.

Jobs you expect

There are a wide range of career opportunities available for individuals with a degree in criminology, including:

  1. Law enforcement officer: Criminologists may work as police officers, detectives, or federal agents, investigating crimes and enforcing laws.
  2. Probation officer: Criminologists may work with individuals who have been released from prison, monitoring their behavior and helping them reintegrate into society.
  3. Forensic scientist: Criminologists may work in forensic labs, analyzing physical evidence from crime scenes and helping to solve cases.
  4. Corrections officer: Criminologists may work in prisons or other correctional facilities, supervising inmates and ensuring the safety of staff and the public.
  5. Social worker: Criminologists may work in social service agencies, providing support and assistance to individuals and families affected by crime.
  6. Research assistant: Criminologists may work in research positions, collecting and analyzing data on crime trends and patterns.
  7. Crime scene investigator: Criminologists may work as crime scene investigators, collecting and analyzing physical evidence from crime scenes to help solve cases.
  8. Lawyer: Criminologists may go on to pursue careers as attorneys, representing clients in criminal cases and advocating for justice.
  9. Criminology professor: Criminologists may also work as professors, teaching criminology courses at the undergraduate or graduate level.
  10. Policy analyst: Criminologists may work in policy positions, analyzing the effectiveness of current crime prevention and control strategies and making recommendations for improvement.

Universities & Schools

No items found.

Certificates