Overview

A career in pharmacy involves preparing and dispensing medications to patients, as well as providing information about their proper use and potential side effects. To become a pharmacist, individuals typically need to complete a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree program, which typically takes four years to complete.

Here is a general overview of the steps one might take to pursue a career in pharmacy:

  1. Complete a bachelor's degree: Most pharmacy schools require applicants to have a bachelor's degree, although it does not have to be in a specific field.
  2. Take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT): The PCAT is a standardized test that measures an applicant's aptitude for pharmacy school. It is required by many pharmacy schools as part of the admissions process.
  3. Enroll in a PharmD program: PharmD programs typically last four years and include both classroom instruction and hands-on experience in a clinical setting.
  4. Pass licensure exams: After completing a PharmD program, individuals must pass a series of exams to become licensed pharmacists. These exams vary by state, but typically include the North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) and the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE).
  5. Find a job: Once licensed, individuals can seek employment as pharmacists in a variety of settings, including hospitals, pharmacies, and other healthcare facilities.

It is worth noting that some states may have additional requirements for becoming a pharmacist, such as completing a certain number of hours of supervised practice or continuing education. It is important to research the specific requirements in the state where you wish to practice.

Jobs you expect

There are a wide variety of jobs available in the field of pharmacy, including:

  1. Retail pharmacist: Retail pharmacists work in pharmacies and other retail settings, such as grocery stores and department stores. They dispense medications to customers, answer questions about medications, and provide advice on how to use medications safely and effectively.
  2. Hospital pharmacist: Hospital pharmacists work in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. They dispense medications to patients, review medication orders for accuracy and safety, and consult with healthcare providers about appropriate medications for patients.
  3. Clinical pharmacist: Clinical pharmacists work in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. They specialize in the use of medications to treat specific diseases or conditions, and may work with patients to develop treatment plans that include medications.
  4. Pharmaceutical sales representative: Pharmaceutical sales representatives promote and sell prescription medications to healthcare providers, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists.
  5. Research pharmacist: Research pharmacists work in research and development settings, such as pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions. They may be involved in the development of new medications or the testing of existing medications for safety and effectiveness.
  6. Consulting pharmacist: Consulting pharmacists work with patients and healthcare providers to develop and implement medication management plans. They may work in a variety of settings, including nursing homes, home healthcare agencies, and outpatient clinics.
  7. Specialty pharmacist: Specialty pharmacists specialize in the use of medications to treat specific diseases or conditions, such as cancer or HIV. They may work in specialty pharmacies, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.
  8. Compounding pharmacist: Compounding pharmacists prepare customized medications for patients, using raw ingredients and specialized equipment. They may work in compounding pharmacies or other healthcare settings.

Universities & Schools

Mohammed I university
Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy

Medical & Health Sciences
Oujda, Morocco
Visit site
Cadi Ayyad University
Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Marrakech

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Marrakech

Medical & Heath Sciences
Marrakech, Morocco
Visit site

Certificates

T-SHAPED EXPERT

Pharmacy

Medical & Health Sciences

You made the decision, now it's time to enhance it and gain the depth of knowledge you need to advance.

T-SHAPED EXPERT

Pharmacy

Medical & Health Sciences

You made the decision, now it's time to enhance it and gain the depth of knowledge you need to advance.

Overview

A career in pharmacy involves preparing and dispensing medications to patients, as well as providing information about their proper use and potential side effects. To become a pharmacist, individuals typically need to complete a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree program, which typically takes four years to complete.

Here is a general overview of the steps one might take to pursue a career in pharmacy:

  1. Complete a bachelor's degree: Most pharmacy schools require applicants to have a bachelor's degree, although it does not have to be in a specific field.
  2. Take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT): The PCAT is a standardized test that measures an applicant's aptitude for pharmacy school. It is required by many pharmacy schools as part of the admissions process.
  3. Enroll in a PharmD program: PharmD programs typically last four years and include both classroom instruction and hands-on experience in a clinical setting.
  4. Pass licensure exams: After completing a PharmD program, individuals must pass a series of exams to become licensed pharmacists. These exams vary by state, but typically include the North American Pharmacist Licensure Exam (NAPLEX) and the Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Exam (MPJE).
  5. Find a job: Once licensed, individuals can seek employment as pharmacists in a variety of settings, including hospitals, pharmacies, and other healthcare facilities.

It is worth noting that some states may have additional requirements for becoming a pharmacist, such as completing a certain number of hours of supervised practice or continuing education. It is important to research the specific requirements in the state where you wish to practice.

Jobs you expect

There are a wide variety of jobs available in the field of pharmacy, including:

  1. Retail pharmacist: Retail pharmacists work in pharmacies and other retail settings, such as grocery stores and department stores. They dispense medications to customers, answer questions about medications, and provide advice on how to use medications safely and effectively.
  2. Hospital pharmacist: Hospital pharmacists work in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. They dispense medications to patients, review medication orders for accuracy and safety, and consult with healthcare providers about appropriate medications for patients.
  3. Clinical pharmacist: Clinical pharmacists work in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. They specialize in the use of medications to treat specific diseases or conditions, and may work with patients to develop treatment plans that include medications.
  4. Pharmaceutical sales representative: Pharmaceutical sales representatives promote and sell prescription medications to healthcare providers, such as doctors, nurses, and pharmacists.
  5. Research pharmacist: Research pharmacists work in research and development settings, such as pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions. They may be involved in the development of new medications or the testing of existing medications for safety and effectiveness.
  6. Consulting pharmacist: Consulting pharmacists work with patients and healthcare providers to develop and implement medication management plans. They may work in a variety of settings, including nursing homes, home healthcare agencies, and outpatient clinics.
  7. Specialty pharmacist: Specialty pharmacists specialize in the use of medications to treat specific diseases or conditions, such as cancer or HIV. They may work in specialty pharmacies, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.
  8. Compounding pharmacist: Compounding pharmacists prepare customized medications for patients, using raw ingredients and specialized equipment. They may work in compounding pharmacies or other healthcare settings.

Universities & Schools

Mohammed I university
Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy

Medical & Health Sciences
Oujda, Morocco
Visit site
Cadi Ayyad University
Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Marrakech

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Marrakech

Medical & Heath Sciences
Marrakech, Morocco
Visit site

Certificates